Conflict Resolution POLS7502 with Dr Morgan Brigg

This course provides an overview of the conflict resolution field and an understanding of core principles and processes for the creative, constructive and collaborative resolution of conflict. Distributive, integrative and transformative approaches to conflict resolution are considered in relation to key conflict resolution processes including dialogue and mediation. The course introduces practical skills including process design, preparing agendas, dealing with impasses, and reframing volatile exchanges. You will also gain an understanding of the qualities of constructive negotiators and interveners in conflict situations. Learning in the course builds upon scholarship, case studies, and practical exercises.

Before you enrol in any course, please check with your Faculty that completion of this course fulfils your program requirements.

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Ethics and Human Rights POLS7503 with Dr Emma Hutchinson

This course addresses key ethical dilemmas in world politics. It begins by surveying the main ethical traditions in international relations, such as cosmopolitanism, communitarianism, feminism and postcolonialism. The course then engages a range of practical issues, including human rights, international law, humanitarian intervention and poverty. Lectures and seminar discussions alternate with alternative teaching methods, including participatory learning and simulation exercises.

Before you enrol in any course, please check with your Faculty that completion of this course fulfils your program requirements.

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Studying Peace and Conflict POLS7551 with Dr Sebastian Kaempf

This course provides postgraduate students with no prior background in peace and conflict studies a necessary theoretical grounding in the subject. The principal purpose of this course is to introduce students to the various theoretical approaches to the study of peace and conflict studies. In particular, it focuses on the causes of war and violence, the relationship between security and development, human security, the ethical and legal restraints on war, the politics and practice of humanitarian aid, and the role of international institutions.

Before you enrol in any course, please check with your Faculty that completion of this course fulfils your program requirements.

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Arms Control and Disarmament POLS7506 with Associate Professor Marianne Hanson

Addresses the political, strategic, legal and humanitarian issues directing arms control and disarmament processes. The course examines conventional weapons (such as landmines, small arms and light weapons) and weapons of mass destruction (nuclear, biological and chemical weapons). It draws on strategic analyses as well as on the range of international treaties, and examines traditional and current ways of viewing these weapons, looking especially at how the international community has sought to constrain or eliminate these.

Before you enrol in any course, please check with your Faculty that completion of this course fulfils your program requirements.

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Gender, Peace and Security in Global and Local Perspective POLS7523 with Dr Nicole George

Going beyond commonplace perceptions that equate violence with men and victim-hood with women, this course examines how masculine and feminine roles are constructed and embodied in conflict and peacemaking. We examine the gendered expectations borne by men in conflict, the varied roles women play in the prosecution of conflict, the gendered face of conflict-related violence and the need for greater attention to gender in all efforts to build peace and resolve conflict. United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security (and later follow-up resolutions), will form an important focal point for deliberation in this course, alongside other historical and contemporary case-studies. Students will gain enhanced gender analysis skills and an understanding of how and why these are pertinent to assessments of conflict, insecurity and peace-building.
 
Before you enrol in any course, please check with your Faculty that completion of this course fulfils your program requirements.
 
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Preventing War Crimes and Atrocities with Professor Alex Bellamy
From Syria to South Sudan and Myanmar genocide, war crimes, and other atrocities remain a recurrent of contemporary conflict. This course examines the politics and practice of efforts to prevent these crimes. It will focus on why atrocities happen and what motivates the perpetrators and the different approaches to addressing the root causes of atrocity crimes, the pathways to escalation, and the specific triggers. The course examines different preventive tools and approaches and the political issues and problems that emerge in the practice of prevention in various parts of the world. It will also cover topics related to atrocity prevention and state violence, gender and sexual violence, humanitarian crisis, and policy-relevant mechanisms and approaches to mass atrocity crime prevention. The course will focus on contemporary and historical situations. Students will also have the opportunity to experience some of the practical challenges associated with atrocity prevention through an immersive multi-week simulation embedded into the course and its¿ assessment.
Before you enrol in any course, please check with your Faculty that completion of this course fulfils your program requirements.

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